Why it’s so hard to #DeleteFacebook: Constant psychological boosts keep you hooked

By S. Shyam Sundar, Distinguished Professor of Communication & Co-Director of the Media Effects Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, Bingjie Liu, Ph.D. Student in Mass Communications, Pennsylvania State University, Michael Krieger, Ph.D. Student in Mass Communications, Pennsylvania State University, and Carlina DiRusso, Ph.D. Student in Mass Communications, Pennsylvania State University. Your finger may hover, but it’s…

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How to share photos without blasting them all over the internet

Show off cute baby pics without losing your privacy. Share your photos with only a select group of people. When you’ve got a photo to show off, you don’t necessarily want to plaster it all over your Twitter or Instagram accounts for the whole world to see…

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US judge orders FBI, CIA, NSA to disclose Occupy spying

“The government should not be investigating its citizens simply because they’ve raised their voices in dissent, whether it’s against government or corporate policy,” Hetznecker said on Tuesday.

Image attributed to Mike Fleshman (Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license).

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Ninety-five Theses Against the Democratic and Republican Duopoly

by Shawn C. Gay, Ph.D. Founder, Earth Advocacy News EA News note: A pdf version of this publication is available here. Please share the URL or pdf version of this post if you find it useful and informative. November 1, 2016 In the spirit of Martin Luther, this list of theses has been compiled as … Read moreNinety-five Theses Against the Democratic and Republican Duopoly

Senate Rejects Proposed New FBI Surveillance Powers That Would Cull Digital Privacy

digital privacy under attack

The amendment, which was sponsored by Arizona Republican Senator John McCain, received 58 votes. That was two shy of the 60 votes needed to end further debate and move on to lump the amendment into a criminal justice funding bill. 46 Republicans and 11 Democrats supported the ammendent while seven Republicans and 30 Democrats dissented.

The amendment would have permitted the FBI to expand the types of information it collects through a special subpoena tool called a National Security Letter, which allows surveillance without needing a court order. Had the amendment passed, the FBI would be allowed to look at what websites someone visits and for how long, the IP addresses they use as well as email subject lines without needing a court warrant.

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