The oceans’ last chance: ‘It has taken years of negotiations to set this up’

Wildlife in most of the lawless high seas faces an existential threat from fishing, shipping and the military. Next month, a landmark UN conference could finally bring hope

Great Barrier Reef: 30% of coral died in ‘catastrophic’ 2016 heatwave

Report chronicles ‘mass mortality’, the extent and severity of which has shocked scientists
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Wildlife reserve for Antarctica would be world’s largest

Vast 1.8m sq km fishing-free zone would protect species, such as penguins, leopard seals and whales, and help mitigate the effects of climate change

Dutch prototype clean-up boom brings Pacific plastics solution a step closer

Clean-up broom for ocean debris

If tests of the 100m-long barrier that collects rubbish on the sea’s surface are successful, it could be deployed at a larger scale in the ‘great Pacific garbage patch’

Celebrate World Oceans Day 2016!

According to the United Nations website: “The ocean is the heart of our planet. Like your heart pumping blood to every part of your body, the ocean connects people across the Earth, no matter where we live. The ocean regulates the climate, feeds millions of people every year, produces oxygen, is the home to an incredible array of wildlife, provides us with important medicines, and so much more! In order to ensure the health and safety of our communities and future generations, it’s imperative that we take the responsibility to care for the ocean as it cares for us.”

Read moreCelebrate World Oceans Day 2016!

Great Barrier Reef needs $10bn for chance of survival, scientists say

This election is Australia’s last chance to save the reef, which requires $1bn a year for 10 years to reduce water pollution to give it a chance to survive climate change, report warns