Life after death: Americans are embracing new ways to leave their remains

‘Green burials’ that use biodegradable coffins or lessen the environmental impact in other ways are on the rise. For the past century, most Americans have accepted a limited set of options…

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We now have proof that conservation funding works

Perhaps you think that what we do contribute to help the world’s plants and animals does little to help. A study published in Nature has just proved that conservation money in the past 25 years has made a huge difference…

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Everything you need to cure your smartphone addiction

No wonder smartphones have taken over our lives: They snap our photos, maintain our calendars, put us in touch with loved ones, store our music, let us work on the go, provide access to the vast storehouse of knowledge called the internethellip;

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The science of fright: Why we love to be scared

Scary pumpkins are the least of what frightens us at Halloween, a day devoted to being frightened. Fear may be as old as life on Earth. It is a fundamental, deeply wired reaction, evolved over the history of biology…

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The year’s most awe-inspiring—and devastating—wildlife photos

These are 2017’s big winners. The good life Grand title winner 2017, Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year (Also winner of the 15-17 years old category). Nelson, a teenager from the Netherlands, captured this image of Caco—a lowlands gorilla—in Odzala National Park in the Republic of Congo. Caco is enjoying a ball-shaped breadfruit in the picture.…

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Study: Pollution is the World’s No. 1 Killer

Pollution is the world’s No. 1 killer, a new study says, causing more premature deaths than war, terrorism, natural disasters, cigarettes and disease. A new study in the medical journal Lancet said pollution, both outdoor and indoor, killed about 9 million people in 2015, or one out of every six deaths. “Pollution threatens fundamental human rights,…

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Micro solutions for a macro problem: How marine algae could help feed the world

By William Moomaw, Professor Emeritus of International Environmental Policy, Tufts University and Asaf Tzachor, Doctoral Candidate, Science, Technology and Policy, UCL. Microalgae (shown here, _Haematococcus_) convert water and carbon dioxide to oxygen and nutritious biomass in the presence of light. Algaennovation, CC BY Our planet faces a growing food crisis. According to the United Nations, more…

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Learn why these Old East Dallas community gardens have thrived for nearly 30 years

DALLAS — Tucked into Dallas’ rapidly growing urban infrastructure, the East Dallas and Live Oak community gardens are almost impossible to miss. These are two of the city’s oldest, most productive community gardens, striking strips of green along Fitzhugh Avenue. They are thriving bastions of agriculture amidst brick, steel and concrete…

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Houstonians’ say their allergies are horrible, but doctors think they know what’s to blame

HOUSTON Experts agree the data shows Houston isn’t a great place for people with allergies. According to a doctor at the Baylor College of Medicine, Hurricane Harvey’s remnants may not only be exacerbating conditions in the short run, but they could cause allergy patients misery for years, or even decades, to come…

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People Are Not Their Politics: As I Visited Russia, I Found We Have More in Common Than We Think

Current events have thrust two of the world’s superpowers into a period of mistrust, political animosity, and paranoia, with every new revelation leading to more suspicion. The situation is not unlike how it was when my American grandmother visited the Soviet Union 35 years ago…

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