Gloucester cathedral’s zero-carbon footprint

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According to this letter to The Guardian, the Gloucester cathedral will install 200 solar panels and purchase the balance of their electricity from zero-carbon footprint green sources.

 


Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Gloucester cathedral’s zero-carbon footprint” was written by Letters, for The Guardian on Friday 20th May 2016 17.17 UTC

I note your recent correspondence on church roofs and solar panels (Letters, 19 May). Gloucester cathedral has recently been awarded a substantial grant for Project Pilgrim phase one: the heart of Gloucester from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Project Pilgrim is a £6m restoration and improvement project to help the cathedral to fulfil its role as a dynamic place of spiritual, community and heritage activity.

A key part of the proposals fully supports the Church of England’s Shrinking the Footprint campaign as we will install approximately 200 solar panels on the cathedral’s nave roof.

Gloucester will be the oldest cathedral to embrace this very modern technology, and we have been running a successful Sponsor Our Solar Panels campaign over the last six months to raise the £54,000 necessary to take this significant step to becoming a greener and more sustainable organisation. We are delighted to have raised £47,341 and are now looking for the last donations to take us to our target.

Work will begin in the autumn and we should be able to generate around 25% of the main cathedral electricity from our new panels, including power for our air source heat system. Our remaining supply will continue to have a zero carbon footprint via green purchasing. The installation will also form the basis for the development of a green volunteers group. We have had overwhelming support for this move towards renewable energy from Gloucester diocese, partners and the local community.
The Very Rev Stephen Lake
Dean of Gloucester

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